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Home > Telescopes > Refractor telescopes > Starwave 152 V2 "Red Tube" Achromat Refractor Telescope

Starwave 152 V2 "Red Tube" Achromat Refractor Telescope

Starwave 152 V2 "Red Tube" Achromat Refractor Telescope
Starwave 6" V2 Red Tube 152mm Achromat Refractor Telescope Starwave 6" V2 Red Tube 152mm Achromat Refractor Telescope Starwave 6" V2 Red Tube 152mm Achromat Refractor Telescope Starwave 6" V2 Red Tube 152mm Achromat Refractor Telescope Gary Palmer Starwave 152 Achromat Refractor GPCAM Solar Prominence Image Moon Mosaic Starwave 152mm refractor Altair GPCAM by Gary Palmer Solar Image of the Day Gary Palmer Starwave 152mm "Big Red" Achromat
Price: £829.00
Incl. VAT 20% ( £138.17 )
Product code: SW152-ACHR-V2
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The Starwave 152mm V2 delivers rich field views of the night sky using a large 6 inch / 152mm of unobstructed aperture at an incredible price. What's more, this lens isn't your average achromat lens. It is constructed from high quality Japanese Ohara and German Schott glass with top quality coatings, a very smooth polish and accurate surface figure free from striae.

We sent a unit (with a smaller 2" focuser) to astronomy writer Ade Ashford, who has written a comprehensive Starwave 152 Achromat review (Link opens new window). NOTE: The review telescope was the older version with 2.0" Crayford focuser. The newer Starwave Red Tube 152 Achromat ships with the larger 3.0" focuser and improved optics.

Another use for the Starwave 152mm Achromat is solar imaging. If you ever wanted to push your Daystar Quark or Quantum to the next level this optical tube has it all. 6" of aperture and a fast focal ratio for the fastest frame rates. Check out solar imager Gary Palmer's amazing solar shots with Altair GPCAM Mono, Daystar Quark and Starwave 152mm Achromat to see what can be achieved.
For rich field viewing of deep sky objects such as comets, clusters and nebulae, the Starwave 152 offers a higher contrast view equivalent to an 8" Newtonian reflector, with similar perceived light grasp, but without the maintenance overhead and need for regular collimation. It also sports higher contrast due to the lack of central obstruction which makes deepsky objects appear to "pop" out from the background for very pleasing views. By using a Contrast Booster filter to remove any residual chromatic aberration, the Starwave 152 F5.9 can also be used for high powered observation of the moon and planets. This often isn't possible with cheap mass-produced achromatic optics of similar focal length. It should be noted that chromatic aberration of this telescope is very low considering the fast focal ratio of the lens system, and that the lens design has been optimised for the yellow/green wavelengths to which the human eye is most sensitive. Therefore visual performance is better than the traditional Frauhofer achromat designs employed in cheaper achromats, and as reviewer Ade Ashford comments, the Starwave 152 Achromat outperforms typical F8 Achromats of the same aperture.
The inside of the optical tube has several baffles, and the multilayer lens coatings are extremely efficient to further improve image contrast. Surface polish is imrpoved to reduce scatter, which is very low for such a large aperture refractor lens. All these factors make the Starwave 152mm a high contrast telescope for achromat lovers who want a short, portable portable optical tube, but with with "big glass" 6" aperture.
At only 760mm length when the dewshield is folded back, the Starwave 152 one of the most portable 6" aperture refractors on the market today. It will put less strain on your mount too, because the 9kg weight is distributed along a shorter length than other larger refractors, so torque / moment-arm effects are minimised.
Together with the Altair Sabre mount, counterweight, and counterweight shaft, the Starwave 152 is a great scope for effortless sweeping of the richer areas of the night sky and examination of deepsky objects. The highly tolerant Altair Lightwave LER 68 degree wide eyepiece range is recommended in particular, as are the Altair KITAKARU RPL Orthoscopic eyepieces. The Altair Premium CLS filter will also deliver good results with this telescope due to the large unobstructed aperture, especially on the Orion nebula and suchlike. The Altair Premium OIII filter also delivered greatly improved detail on the Ring Nebula in Vega during testing.
Starwave 152 Achromat Refractor Features:
  • Fully multi-coated 152mm doublet achromatic lens in a fully collimatable lens cell, focal length 900mm (F5.9). Finest Ohara/Schott glass.
  • Large format 3.0" Dual Speed Crayford focuser
  • Tube OD 176mm
  • Transport length (Dewcap folded) 760mm
  • Carry handle and Vixen-format dovetail bar included.
  • Altair universal finder scope bracket included.
  • Weight 11.2kg
Availability: Hand made optics are completed in limited production runs. If showing out of stock, click the red "notify when in stock" button for an email update when the product is ready to ship.

Altair Astro Product Discussion ForumQuestions about Starwave products?
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Products can be ordered online from Altair with tracked insured shipping to anywhere in the world. For large items shipping price may need to be re-quoted.

Availability: If product shows as out of stock, please click on the "Notify me when in stock" button to receive instant notification of availability. Altair Astro and iOptron reserve the right to change the product price and specification without notice. 

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Customer feedback

Customer Reviews

  • Author: Jeff R Manis
    I've finally had a chance to use this beast and I'm absolutely delighted with it.

    Firstly this is a big telescope but quite manageable on the Sabre mount on an EQ5 tripod with a Skywatcher counterweight opposite (all courtesy of Altair). Although recommended by the manufacturer for low power viewing of star clusters and deep sky objects, this 6 inch is quite at home with the moon and Jupiter, revealing plenty of belt detail at 200x and resolving the moons to distinct discs. Shadow transits should present no problem.

    I've owned several smaller achromat refractors in the past, and this is my retirement present. I was a little sceptical of the short focal length but no more. The star-test is as good as any and the collimation is perfect.

    There is of course a slight violet halo visible around bright solar system objects, however clusters and faint objects display no false colour whatsoever. The coatings are very nice (my first refractor didn't even have coatings revealing my age) and the sky background is coal black, so everything is as it should be! The business end of this refractor sports a very big piece of glass housed in a robust unit, and the focuser, whilst a little on the large size for a primarily visual telescope, goes some way to improving the balance of the tube.

    Thank you for providing such a good product at such a good price and for taking the time to demonstrate the product. I'm very satisfied with this purchase, and would recommend it to anyone who wants a big aperture quality refractor. JRM

    PS: The included handle is a good idea - you will need it!
  • Author: J Rivers
    Boys, just to say thanks from the USA! BIG RED arrived 4 days no hitches and it's just great. Very impressive the wife loves it. Thanks for helping with all those questions I know how busy you are
  • Author: Dave Gibbons
    This is a brief review of my recently aquired Altair Astro Starwave F5.9 Achromatic refractor. It's the latest version with longer retractable dewshield and massiive 3" rotatable focusser in a rather fetching red. It is mated to a humble eq5 with ADM puck and saddle along with beefier 2" eq6 tripod, no drives just a couple of slow motion flexi contols.

    I purchased this after trying to find a complete lightish weight set up via usual channels but after a purchase went awry on astro buysell decided to go with a new richfield refractor . Reviews on this scope in all variants have generally been positive in it's various vendor incarnations an I have always loved achromats -false colour never bothers me and could this one be as good as they say? read on!

    I decided early on that I did not need or want a goto mount and wanted as light as possible sturdy set up so went with a beefed up eq5 with manual slow mo cables. As it's primary use is as a rich field scope giving over 2.4 degrees fov it's very liberating to be electronics free.

    All bits came last week . The OTA itself is stunning just about the best constructed refractor I have ever owned and Ihave had dozens over the years. OTA weighs in at around 11kg add to that a finderscope and 2" diagonal plus eyepiece all in weight around 13kg hence thhe need to beef up mount with ADM saddle and 2" tripod .images attached below.

    So established it looks fantastiic, but so it should for the price a hefty £830 without diagonal or finderscope !

    O.K. Lets cut to the chase and see how it performs under the night sky. I have now had 2 nights out a total of 4 hours viewing and here are my thoughts.

    Firstly it does require at least a 30 min cooldown to get the big lump of glass to thermal equilibrium and get the best images, it is however good to go on widefield low power within 10 min and gives outstanding views, on objects such as galactic clusters orion neb or any rich starfield it gives the finest views I have ever seen . On faint objects such as the crab and m51 m81 and 82 the contrast makes them easily stand out with far more pleasing views than many a larger reflector I have owned. M51 in particular was mesmerizing and I swear you could pick out hints of spiral structure with averted vision. You can just get lost in the depth of field and sheer beauty of the views. Having never owned such a fast refractor before all I can say is it opens up a different viewing experience sharp yet without the abberations of similar focal length newts.

    What about the dreaded Chromatic abberation? Well having owned 3 synta 6" f8 it is absolutely better colour corrected and how this is done at f5.9 I do not know. It is not perfect and has false colour on jupiter and bright stars but will still give very good views up to x150. At this point I did find my minus violet filter worth using on the moon and jupiter but let's be honest you would be better off with an f10 and upwards if that is what you want to do with visual astronomy. Unfortunately I did not have opportunity to test out on tight doubles as on both nights the seeing was below par although did have a brief glimpse of Propus at x250 and a good split for a few seconds again If double stars your bag a good f10 scope will outperform the Starwave in that department -not by much though !

    Intra and extra focal start test show smooth optics with ever so slightly softer intafocal image -still superb though.

    The eq5 and slow mo perform brilliantly by the way and the whole set up very smooth and solid. All in alll a compact if expensive gem

    The only thing I would add is another positive, that's the collimation it is absolutely bang on. I have actually used it with double stacked barlows and a 6mm ortho eyepiece to split sub src second problem!

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